IRANIAN FREEDOM INSTITUTE

for a Free and Democratic IRAN

Amir Abbas Fakhravar

Founder and President

Amir A. Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.

Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.

Amir Abbas Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.
Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.

Arzhang Davoodi

Honorary Chairman

Arzhang Davoodi, teacher, poet, writer and political prisoner faces "Execution" on his court hearing on August 28, 2012, on the new charge of "Enmity against Allah" (Moharebeh) as a result of his peaceful political activism according to Amnesty International's statement, August 23, 2012. Arzhang has been imprisoned for eleven years since October 2003, and still has 16 more years to serve for his opposition to the Islamic Republic and his life long fight for Freedom and Democracy. He is the Secretary General of "Iranian Freedom Movement" and co-founder of "Confederation of Iranian Students." He was in 74 days of hunger strike in Rajaee-Shahr Prison in summer 2010. January 24, 2011, Arzhang Davoodi send a message to the participants of the Iran Democratic Transition Conference, organized by The Institute of World Politics (IWP) and Confederation of Iranian Students at The George Washington University and United States Congress. Arzhang was transferred to Section 209 of Tehran's Evin Prison on June 27, 2012 where he has been tortured up to now.

Amir Abbas Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.
Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.

George William Heiser

Managing Director


George William Heiser II is President/CEO of GWH Consulting, Inc. located in Hume, Virginia.  He  has held several staff and managerial policy positions in the Department of Defense, and served on the National Security Council Staff during the Reagan Administration.  


Mr. Heiser is a U.S. Army Special Forces Vietnam veteran and a graduate of American University’s School of International Service in Washington, D.C. 

Amir Abbas Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.
Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.

Dr. J. Michael Waller

Executive Director

J. Michael Waller, professor of public diplomacy and political warfare at the Institute of World Politics. He served on the White House Task Force on Central America, and has been a consultant to the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, the US Information Agency, the US Agency for International Development, the Office of the Secretary of Defense in support of operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, and the US Army. 

Professor Waller is Vice President for Information Operations of the Center for Security Policy. He is a frequent lecturer and instructor in psychological and information operations for the US military and the intelligence community. Dr. Waller holds the Walter and Leonore Annenberg Chair in International Communication, and directs the Institute's graduate programs on public diplomacy and political warfare. He is also Chairman of the IWP Military Education Committee.
Amir Abbas Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.
Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.

Craig Snider

Chairman

Craig Snider is the Director for the David Horowitz Freedom Center-Philadelphia. Among its key objectives are Academic Reform of Higher Education, and defense of free speech on university campuses, and in the culture at large. 


Mr. Snider is a member of the Dean’s Advisory Council at the University of Pennsylvania’s School of Policy Practice and Research; board member of the Jewish Publishing Group in Philadelphia, a member of AIPAC’s Leadership Council, and a member of the Union League in Philadelphia. 


A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, with a Bachelor of Arts in history and film, Craig also holds an MBA degree from Wharton Graduate School of Management.

Amir Abbas Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.
Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.

Board of Directors

John Maguire

Managing Director

Mr. Maguire is a retired Senior Service officer from the CIA, with wide ranging experience and success in Iraq, the Middle East and Persian Gulf, Africa, with global Special Operations, security issues related to business development and emerging market challenges, international banking and risk management and mitigation. He has over 30 years of intelligence, special operations, counter terrorism, and business planning and development in challenging, emerging markets. Successful business activities have been established in Iraq, East Africa, and the Persian Gulf region.

From 1982 to 2005 Served in overseas and domestic assignments in the Directorate of Operations as a Field Case Officer, and the Directorate of Science and Technology, as a journeyman level officer, mid level manager, as well as Senior Service leadership positions.
Amir Abbas Fakhravar, (Siavash) is an Iranian jailed dissident, award winning writer, blogger, and the recipient of the prestigious Annie Taylor Journalism Award. He is the Secretary General of the Confederation of Iranian Students and President of the Iranian Freedom Institute in Washington, D.C. Currently, Fakhravar serves as Research Fellow and Visiting Lecturer at the Center for the Study of Culture and Security at The Institute of World Politics.
Fakhravar was born on July 6, 1975 in the capital city of Tehran. He was arrested for his writings and his criticism to the Islamic Republic at the age of 17 when he was still in high school. Fakhravar spent over five years in jail and suffered brutal torture in jail. His treatments in the Islamic Republic jails have been described as first known example of "white torture" in Iran by Amnesty International. According to Amnesty International, the cells had no windows, and everything was entirely colored creamy white. The meal was white rice on a white paper plate. If he wanted to use the toilet, he had to put a white slip of paper under the door of the cell to alert guards who reportedly had footwear designed to muffle any sound. Fakhravar was forbidden to talk to anyone.